codon_wheel.jpg

There are a couple steps that you have to take when turning DNA into amino acids. Below I will give you an example using step by step instructions with the following DNA sequence:

TACGGAAGACTAGAAATC
1) Split the DNA sequence into groups of three N-BASES known as a triplet
TAC GGA AGA CTA GAA ATC
2) Next your job is to translate that sequence into mRNA in which you match thymine(T) with adenine(A), adenine(A) with uracil(U), guanine(G) with cytosine(C), and cytosine(C) with guanine(G). When you have them translated and in groups of three, they are known as codons.
AUG CCU UCU GAU CUU UAG
3) The last step you need to perform is to use a codon chart or wheel to translate your mRNA sequence into amino acids. (wheel shown above)

Methionine (start), Proline, Serine, Aspartic acid, Leucine, Stop



Significance


The significance of a codon wheel is that it helps in visualizing which amino acids will be produced from specific orders of codons. Not only do they help visualize, but they also assist in simplifying the relationship between codons and amino acids. Without the codon wheel, it would take a longer time to decipher which codons produce which amino acids. Actually, without any form of a table to help show which three sequences produce which amino acid, it would be quite time-consuming and tedious to find out which amino acids are resulted from translation. Codon wheels and other forms of graphs and tables help in summarizing specific sequences and make jobs of not only students, but Scientists much easier.